Cooking seared tuna with Fighting Fifty

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Cooking seared tuna with Fighting Fifty

So, I have previously posted the delicious recipe for sesame seared tuna with Asian green salad but had the chance to cook the dish with Tracey McAlpine from Fighting Fifty.  Always love cooking with Tracey as we have such as laugh.

What you need to know about tuna

Tuna belongs to the oily group of fish along with salmon, trout, mackerel, sardines and herring.  These fish are a rich source of omega 3, which research has shown can have a positive effect on many areas of health.  Tuna, along with other oily fish is beneficial for heart health and although it is not entirely clear exactly how omega 3 fatty acids benefit the heart, the results show they do.  It is also thought that the heart health benefits may be a combination of omega 3 fatty acids and some other component of oily fish.

Omega 3 fatty acids can help to reduce inflammation in the body which is thought to be at the root of many diseases including that of the heart.  These fats also help to increase the amount of good (HDL) cholesterol and reduce overall triglycerides in the body as well as thin the blood, which also benefits the health of your heart.

Omega 3 has also been associated with good skin and helps to maintain healthy skin cell membranes that keep it supple and moisturised.  The anti-inflammatory effect of these fats may also help with skin conditions such as psoriasis.

It is recommended that we try and eat about two servings of oily fish each week in order to glean adequate omega 3.  These fatty acids are referred to as essential as they must be obtained from the diet.  However, you should try and limit your intake to no more than four servings each week given the fact that oily fish have a high level of heavy metals, which may build up over time.

Tuna is also rich in vitamin A, which is important for healthy skin, immune system and normal vision.  Iron is also an important mineral in the diet and food surveys show that up to 23% of women in the UK have inadequate intakes, which can result in tiredness and fatigue.  Tuna contains a useful 10% of the RDA for iron.  Another key mineral is magnesium that plays a key role in hundreds of chemical reactions in the body and is involved in muscle relaxation and the conversion of food into energy (tuna contains 17% of the RDA per serving).

Tuna are also a rich source of many B vitamins, in particular B12 (over 200% of the RDA).  B vitamins are essential for the health of your skin and required for energy metabolism.  Low intakes of B vitamins can result in tiredness and fatigue.

Try this recipe for yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

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