Ingredients

Home / Nutritious Delicious / Archive by category "Ingredients"
Dementia – tips to help care for loved ones at home

Dementia – tips to help care for loved ones at home

Guide to help loved ones with dementia to eat well  (download PDF here  Guide to help loved ones with dementia to eat well  Guide to help loved ones with dementia to eat well )

Having trained in public health I take a particular interest in dementia care and have worked closely with the NHS and care home groups delivering expert advice on how to help older people with dementia to eat well.   I hope to share a little insight and a few tips to keep your loved ones with dementia properly nourished.

 

What is dementia?

Dementia is a word used to describe a group of symptoms that occur when brain cells stop working properly.  This happens to specific areas of the brain, which affect how you think, remember and communicate.

The condition has a huge impact on the lives of someone with the condition and those around them.  Dementia is now the biggest killer of women and third biggest killer of men in the UK.

 

Dementia statistics  

  • 850K people living with dementia in the UK and is expected to increase to over 1 million by 2025
  • 24% of males and 35% of females born in 2015 will develop dementia in their lifetime
  • A person’s risk of developing dementia increases from one in 14 over the age of 65 and to one in six over the age of 80
  • Over 42K people under 65 years old have dementia in the UK

 

Why do older people with dementia need to eat well?

The purpose of a good diet is that someone receives the right amount of energy and nutrients they need to maintain bodily processes and protect against ill health.  There is plenty of evidence to support the fact that a poor diet will increase the chances of illness and many other health conditions as well as lowering someone’s quality of life.  Eating a wide variety of foods regularly will ensure someone’s dietary needs are met although in the case if dementia there are often many challenges that must be overcome to achieve this.

 

How the ageing body changes

Ageing can render the immune system less efficient, which makes older people with dementia more vulnerable to illness and infection.  A slower digestive system make constipation more common and a loss of muscle and bone strength increases the risk of falls and fractures.  Understanding thirst can also occur as less efficient kidneys make urine less concentrated and this can make dehydration more common.

 

Why are older people more likely to become malnourished?

A good diet is important for everyone but even more so for people with dementia who are at greater risk of becoming malnourished.   Not eating an adequate diet can lead to someone becoming under-nourished and this will impact on the greater chance of getting ill, skin problems, muscle weakness, tiredness, confusion and irritability.  There are many reasons why this this may be more common in older people with dementia: 

  • Smaller appetites and eating too little food
  • Chronic disease
  • Increased need for energy and nutrients due to illness or wound healing
  • Chewing and swallowing problems impact no food choices
  • Medicines may contribute to change in appetite, abnormal eating or eating disorders
  • Changes to the senses of sight, hearing, taste and smell make meals less enjoyable
  • Reduced communication skills make it difficult to explain your food preferences or that the temperature of your food is too hot or cold or that you may still be hungry

 

Informal dementia carers in the UK

There are currently 700K informal carers for the 850K people living with dementia in the UK.  Looking after someone with dementia is challenging and often impacts on family relationships and physical and psychological health but at the same time it can be rewarding and strengthen family bonds through the intimate relationship.  Caring for someone at home can allow loved ones to catch glimpses of past personality such as the occasional smile, laugh or a few words that allow an emotional connection to stay alive and that may be missed in residential care.

Whether you’re a sibling, child or family friend, the effects of possible sleep deprivation and carrying out all the household chores, extra cleaning and laundry as well as moving and lifting their loved one can be exhausting and this is even more relevant as 44% of carers have a long-standing illness or disability according to research carried out by NHS digital.

Providing adequate food can be a challenge for home carers.  Budget constraints, lack of food knowledge or cooking skills, managing difficult eating behaviours anda exhaustion means that cooking home-prepared meals from scratch three times a day is often not a reality.  Understanding how to make mealtimes more manageable and quick healthy food fixes can lessen the burden whilst keeping your loved ones with dementia healthy.

 

A few tips to help people with dementia to eat well

Dementia is a fluid condition and every case is different but I hope these tips can offer a little insight and advice to help manage mealtimes.

 

Stimulate the appetite!

If you’re struggling to get someone to eat then try whetting their appetite.  Any increase in activity can help instigate hunger so a short walk or chair-based activity may help (this also helps relieve constipation).  Don’t fill stomachs with excess fluids before mealtimes as this will blunt the appetite. Prepare very flavoursome meals by adding spices or strong flavoured foods such as mature cheese, mustard or tomato puree.  Food should also look appealing and eye-catching with bright colours as we often, ‘eat with our eyes’. 

Try and use simple food cues to help older people with dementia orientate themselves with mealtimes.  The smell of toast or coffee in the morning, the clanking of pans or sight of someone cooking may all help someone with dementia to understand that it’s time to eat.

Mealtimes can be flexible and it may be easier to focus on the times of the day when someone usually has a bigger appetite, whether this is at breakfast, lunch or evening meal.  You should also offer small portions of food if someone has a small appetite as too much can be off-putting.

=============================================================================

Create a calm eating environment

  • Avoid noise from the television or radio at mealtimes
  • Make sure plates are clearly visible on the table opting for red or blue colours or ones with a coloured ring around the edge (you could also try a white plate with coloured placemat)
  • Don’t clutter the table as this can be very distracting
  • Allow plenty of time to eat
  • Eat together

=============================================================================

 

Take account of food preferences

Understanding someone’s food likes and dislikes can make a difference at mealtimes.  Be adventurous with new flavours but not to the point that someone refuses food.  Think about food occasions that the person your caring for may have been familiar with as it may even trigger a memory and connection with that particular food.  A Sunday roast, Christmas dinner, Strawberries during Wimbledon, seasonal foods, Birthday cake or hot cross buns at Easter are all good examples.

Taste and smell diminishes with age and more so with dementia so food preferences may change day-by-day.  It’s not uncommon for people with dementia to prefer sweet foods so try adding a little honey to savoury quiches, pies and omelettes or serve main meals with apple or cranberry sauce.  Fruit chutneys are also great to serve with cheese or cold meats, which also work as finger foods.  You can also add honey to roast vegetables and apples or dried fruit work well in stews, casseroles, curries and other one-pot dishes that can be cooked in batches and frozen.

Be aware that someone may not remember when they last ate and this may cause reluctance to meals.  Listen to what they are saying or trying to communicate and try and work around this with the food you offer. For example, if the person you’re caring for keeps asking about breakfast then you could consider several breakfasts across that day to encourage them to eat.

 

Maintain independence

It’s important that someone with dementia is given the opportunity to feed themselves as this helps retain a sense of independence and dignity.  Don’t worry about neatness as it’s more important that someone is eating independently. This may mean being patient and mealtimes could be lengthy and often require gentle encouragement along the way as well as appropriate supervision to reduce any risks of choking.

As dementia progresses someone may become less dexterous and lose the ability to use cutlery.  You can find specially adapted cutlery, cups with handles and non-slip placemats to make things easier.  If cutlery becomes difficult to use then provide finger foods.  A finger food diet can be just as nutritious and served hot or cold.  Pizza slices, chopped vegetables, fruit, meat pies, boiled eggs, potato wedges, sandwiches, fruit loaf are all good examples.

 

=============================================================================

Recognising weight loss

There are many reasons why someone with dementia may lose their appetite such as suffering with constipation, swallowing issues, depression, mouth ulcers or painful teeth.  It’s important to be aware of weight loss in people with dementia and act immediately to help regain a healthy appetite and reduce the risk of malnutrition.

  • Bones visible under the skin
  • Loose clothing
  • Loose rings
  • Loose fitting dentures
  • Leaving food on the plate

==============================================================================

 

Fortify foods 

If someone is losing weight then you may need to consider fortifying foods as it’s important to get as much nutrition as possible into a small serving of food, especially calories and protein.  Full fat milk, cream, cheese, oils, butter, mayonnaise, crème fraiche, milk powder, coconut milk, avocado, nut butters and pureed tofu are a few ideas of foods you can use. 

Nourishing smoothies can also help to top up someone’s calorie and protein intake.  There’s no end to the different combinations you can use and the best base is full fat milk.  

 

=============================================================================

Planning meals

When you’re trying to think about what food to prepare each day it’s worth paying thought to a few factors that may make mealtimes more enjoyable for people with dementia.

  • Combine colours on the plate to help meals become more visible. Choosing three or four is a good target such as steamed fish with carrots and peas
  • Combine textures to make food more appealing. Mix up crisp, crunchy, chewy, soft and smooth foods (unless someone is having difficulty swallowing)
  • Vary taste but don’t add too many favours to any one meal
  • Have a buffet day with finger foods such as quiche, scotch eggs, vegetable sticks, cocktail sausages and yoghurts

==============================================================================

 

Quick fixes 

If you don’t have the time to prepare something from scratch or are just too exhausted then there is nothing wrong with turning to good quality ready meals as a quick option.  Dishes such as lasagna, cottage pie, fish pie, macaroni cheese and risotto all provide a good soft food option.  Canned foods can also save time and offer a quick nourishing meal.  Canned fruit, fish (watch out for bones that pose a choking risk) or even baked beans are good examples and can be partnered with other ingredients.  Eggs are also a quick food option and can be scrambled with soft vegetables such as tomatoes and mushrooms or made into a simple omelette.

Pre-prepared foods can be used to make an interesting buffet meal that is also suitable for people that require a finger food diet.  You can also cook foods in batches and keep individual portions in the freezer to help save time. 

 

==============================================================================

Food textures

Some older people with dementia may need the texture of their food altered.

  • Difficulty using cutlery or with a tremor may need finger foods
  • Difficulty chewing and poor teeth may need softer foods (mash, tender meats and fish, soft vegetables)
  • Difficulty swallowing may require a pureed diet (you must seek professional advice to assess someone’s potential swallowing problem before pureeing their diet) 

=============================================================================

 

Hydration

Dehydration is common among older people with dementia as they may not recognise they are thirsty, may forget to drink, may be unable to communicate that they are thirsty, or may refuse to drink because they are worried about incontinence.

Dehydration can cause headaches, confusion, irritability and constipation which can contribute to urinary tract infections.  Older people who are incontinent need to drink more, not less, to encourage the bladder to empty regularly to prevent infection and to exercise the bladder muscles.

We get some of our fluids from food, particularly foods such as soup, stews, fruits and vegetables, jelly, sauces, ice Lolli’s and yoghurt.  All drinks help us to remain hydrated, including tea, coffee, water, milk, fruit teas and fruit juices.

 

Caring for someone with dementia is a full time job and mealtimes present a whole new set of challenges however, maintaining a well-nourished body will help someone with dementia achieve a better quality of life and help to deter the onset of other illnesses that may make caring for them even more challenging.

 

More informtation

 

Dementia UK

Caroline Walker trust

Alzheimer’s research UK 

Age UK

 

Download PDF here Guide to help loved ones with dementia to eat well 

 

When is the best time to eat?

When is the best time to eat?

Mindful eating

I was recently asked by the Daily Mail Online about my favourite go-to breakfast?

This had me thinking a little bit about how my view of breakfast and eating in general has changed over the years.  There was a time when I conformed to the view that breakfast was the most important meal of the day and that you should eat as soon as you get up.  However, as i’ve gotten a little older (heaven forbid I am nearly 40!! – cringe) my food taste and lifestyle has changed.  I’m no longer dashing to the gym at the crack of dawn as stressful deadlines and lack of organization skills have me up early, frantically typing to meet overdue deadlines and for some reason the last thing I feel like doing when I’m stressed or distracted is eating.  Coffee is the only thing that’s going to hit the spot at 6am.

Forget the old adage of eating breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and supper like a pauper.  Who even came up with this anyway! I now firmly believe that eating should be more intuitive.  Not that you should throw regular meal times out of the window but I do think that we need to learn to listen to our body and eat when we genuinely feel hungry.

Understanding your own hunger and fullness is probably the best thing you can do to help maintain a healthy weight and work in sync with your body.  This doesn’t mean starving yourself because you’re too rushed in the morning to make breakfast or cant be bothered to cook, but satisfying the need for food when your body asks for it.

There’s a whole raft of information out there dictating when, how and what we should be eating, but understanding and listening to your own body is always going to be the best option.  There was a time when we had to hunt for our food and mealtimes were dictated by what you managed to forage or catch.  Although you cant draw comparisons as we have come a long way since then, eating for the sake of eating or at a set times during the day just doesn’t seem to make sense.

It’s really flippant to think this is an easy way to eat as there are wider issues around food that influence how and what people eat but learning to adopt basic mindfulness and intuitive eating skills can help.  Don’t be put off by the sound of these concepts as they really are just common sense.

Whilst a healthy balanced diet is key to good health, the idea of what this is has become very blurred as we have so much access to nutrition advice and media attention on the latest superfood or wonder diet.  Just getting back to basics about healthy eating and focusing your attention more on how you eat and not what you eat will help you to tune into your basic cycle of hunger and satiety.

Tips for mindful eating

Eat slowly

Eating is not a race.  Taking your time to eat and enjoy your food will help you to recognize when you’re full.  Chew your food slowly as this will help with digestion and give your body time to recognize that you are full.  Eating too quickly also leads to indigestion and bloating.  Many fast eaters have adopted these habits from childhood and they often come from large families so trying to educate your children on the idea of eating slowly may go some way in helping to prevent this habit from being passed on.

Switch off! 

Try and make food and eating the main attraction at the dinner table.  Turn the TV off and make dinner time an electronic-free zone.  This doesn’t mean forgoing the Saturday night take-away and movie but just making all other evening meal times about the food without distraction.

Savour the flavour

Eating slowly and savoring every mouthful of food allows you to appreciate the flavours and textures of food, which adds to the enjoyment of eating.  If you wolf down you meal in five minutes then it’s likely you won’t even notice what you’re eating and this can lead to a lack of appreciation making food and eating a mechanical process of eating to live rather than living to eat.

So after all that, what was my favorite breakfast?  Well it was chopped egg and avocado on toast that I actually ate at 11am when I finally felt hungry after a morning of deadlines and coffee.

 

Chopped egg and avocado on toast 

Serves 1

300 calories per serving 

 

Ingredients 

1 egg

1 small avocado

1/2 yellow pepper, deseeded and finely diced

1 spring onions, finely sliced

2 chives, finely chopped

1 small handful of coriander, finely chopped

1/2 lemon, juiced

Sea salt

Black pepper

1 tbsp Extra virgin olive oil

1 slice of granary bread, toasted

 

Method

  1. Place the egg in a small pan of water set over a high heat and bring to the boil.  Simmer for 8 minutes then take the pan off the heat and place under cold tuning water to cool.
  2. Once cooled (about 2 minutes), peel the shell from the egg.  Quarter the egg.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients (except the granary toast) to a medium-sized bowl and combine well.
  4. Serve the egg on a plate with the avocado mixture and granary toast.

 

Download recipe here Chopped egg and avocado on toast 

 

 

 

Quorn, cauliflower and sultana curry

Quorn, cauliflower and sultana curry

Cauliflower, Sultana and Quorn Curry

Serves 4

535 calories per serving

Rich in: potassium, iron, zinc, B6 and vitamin C

This curry is a brilliant example of how you can replace meat for Quorn.  Using Quorn offers a rich source of protein as well as a source of zinc, which has been shown to help maintain a heathy immune system.  Cauliflower is also one of the most humble superfoods.  Although it may not be the most colorful of foods it is packed with vitamin C and sulphur compounds that hep to protect the body against diseases such as cancer. 

 

Ingredients

300g brown rice

1 tbsp Extra virgin olive oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and chopped

1 tbsp curry powder

1 tsp ground cardamom

1 red chilli, finely chopped

1 pinch sea salt

1 pinch black pepper

200g can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed

350g Quorn pieces

3 tbsp sultanas

1 medium cauliflower, trimmed and cut into small florets

½ can of coconut milk (reduced fat)

1 lime, juiced

1 small bunch of mint

1 small bunch of coriander

 

Method  

  1. Set a medium saucepan of water to boil. Once the water is boiling add the rice.  Turn the heat down and simmer for 20 minutes until tender.
  2. Heat a large deep-sided non-stick pan over a medium heat and add the oil. Add the onion, garlic and ginger to the pan and cook gently for 5 minute until softened.
  3. Add the spices to the pan and cook for 1 minute until they become fragrant.
  4. Add 200ml of water to the pan and simmer for 2 minutes. Now add the chilli, salt, pepper, chickpeas, Quorn and sultanas then simmer for a further 10 minutes.
  5. Add the cauliflower florets and a further 150ml of water then simmer for another 5-8 minutes until the cauliflower is tender (keep the cauliflower tender to add texture)
  6. Pour in the coconut milk and add the lime juice, mint and coriander then cook for a further 2 minutes. Check for seasoning and then take off the heat.
  7. Drain the rice and serve in bows with the curry.

 

 Download PDF here Cauliflower curry

 

 

 

Favourite recipe ideas from home cooking sessions with clients

Favourite recipe ideas from home cooking sessions with clients

 

Favourite recipes that I cook with clients in their homes (Download as PDF  Favourite recipes

 

Chopped salad with pomegranate

Serves two

Ingredients

1 lemon, juiced and zested

1 tbsp pomegranate molasses

1 tbsp olive oil

1 cucumber, deseeded and finely chopped

1 spring onions, finely chopped

½ fennel bulb, finely chopped

8 cherry tomatoes, quartered

100g pomegranate seeds

Small handful each of parsley, mint and dill all finely chopped

Method 

  1. Combine ingredients together in a large bowl and serve with one of the dressings below.

 

Honey and allspice dressing

Serves two 

Ingredients

1 medium lemon, juiced

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 tbsp honey

¼ tsp ground allspice

¼ tsp smoked paprika

½ garlic clove, crushed

Sea salt

Pepper

Method

  1. Combine in a smal bowl and serve with salad  

 

Tahini dressing

Serves two 

Ingredients

200g soya (or low fat) yoghurt

1 heaped tbsp tahini

1 garlic clove, minced

1 inch piece of ginger, chopped

1 lime, juiced

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil (best quality)

1 tsp turmeric

Method

  1. Combine in a small bowl and serve with salad

 

Sweet potato and miso dressing

Serves two

Ingredients

100g sweet potato, peeled and diced

15g ginger, finely chopped

25ml lemon juice

25ml rice wine vinegar

35g sweet white miso

10ml sesame oil

75ml olive oil

5g tamari sauce

Method

  1. Combine in a small bowl and serve with salad

 

Turkey and cashew curry

Serves 4

Ingredients

100g cashew nuts

2 vine tomatoes, roughly chopped

2 cloves of garlic

1 thumb sized piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped

Juice of 1 lemon

400g turkey breast, diced

1 tbsp ground cumin

1 tbsp ground coriander

1 tbsp ground turmeric

1 cauliflower, florets

100ml water

200ml reduced fat coconut milk

100g fresh peas

 Method

  1. Place cashew nuts in a blender with the tomatoes, chili, garlic, ginger and lemon juice and blitz to a paste. Transfer this to a large mixing bowl and add in the turkey. Cover with the ground cumin, ground coriander and ground turmeric, cover and leave to marinate for 20 minutes in the fridge.
  2. Meanwhile, place a large saucepan on a high heat and add a drop of oil
  3. Add in the onions and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Add in the marinated turkey and cook for 5-7 minutes until sealed.
  5. Add in the cauliflower, water and coconut milk and bring to a simmer. Keep the heat low and cook for 15 minutes.
  6. Add in the peas and simmer for a further 5 minutes

 

Kale chips with paprika and cashew

Makes 200g

 Ingredients

30g cashew nuts

1 tsp rapeseed oil

50ml water

500g kale (but big fresh leaves not the prepackaged stuff)

1 tsp paprika

1 pinch of Malden salt 

Method  

  1. Preheat your oven to 50°c.
  2. Soak the cashew nuts in water for 20 minutes. Then drain and place them in a blender with the rapeseed oil and 50ml water. Blitz for 5 minutes until completely smooth. Add more water if necessary; the consistency should be like single cream.
  3. Take the kale leaves off the stalk and break the leaves up into bite sized pieces. Place the kale in a large bowl and pour over the cashew cream, toss with you hands to ensure the leaves are coated well.
  4. Place the kale on a baking tray and sprinkle with the paprika and Malden salt.
  5. Place in the oven for 60 minutes until crispy.
  6. You can store these in an airtight contained for up to 2 days.

 

Roasted tikka cauliflower Salad

Serves 2

Ingredients

250g Pearl barley

1 large cauliflower

1 level tbsp tikka curry paste

60g flaked almonds

60g dried cherries (or cranberries)

100g pomegranate seeds

2 tsp nigella (black onion) seeds

1 small handful flat leaf parsley, chopped

Yoghurt and tahini dressing (see above)

Sea salt 

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200C
  2. Cook the barley in boiling water until tender (about 30-40 minutes) then drain and rinse under cold water
  3. In a large roasting tin, break the cauliflower into bite sized pieces and add the curry paste, rubbing in well so all the cauliflower is covered
  4. Place the tin in the oven and cook until tender (about 20 mins)
  5. Whilst the cauliflower is cooking make the dressing by adding all the ingredients to the bender and slowly bending until smooth. It should be the consistency of double cream so loosen with a little water if too thick.
  6. Take out the cauliflower and allow to cool.7. In a large bowl combine the barley, cauliflower, almonds, cherries and pomegranate 8. Drizzle a little of the dressing over the salad and sprinkle with onion seeds

 

Lemon salmon

Serves two

Ingredients

2 salmon fillets

1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil (also, 4 tbsp for the dressing)

1 lemon, halved

1 tbsp chopped parsley

2 tbsp chopped chives

Sea salt

Black pepper

Method

  1. Heat the grill
  2. Coat the salmon with olive oil and a little salt
  3. Place the lemon halves, cut-side down, next to the salmon and grill for about 4 mins each side
  4. Transfer the salmon to a plate and prepare the dressing
  5. To make the dressing squeeze the lemon juice from the charred lemons into a small bowl and add 4 tbsp olive oil, chopped herbs and season.
  6. Pour dressing over the salmon and serve

 

Quinoa, lentil and chicken salad

Serves four

Ingredients 

250g puy lentils, boiled


250g quinoa, boiled

300g chicken breast, thinly sliced

1 ripe mango, sliced

1/2 red onion, finely sliced

1 handful watercress, stalks removed (or pea shoots)

1 small handful mint, chopped

1 small handful coriander, chopped

Dressing

1 lime juiced

1 tsp curry paste

4 tbsp light olive oil

3 tbsp of ½ fat crème fraiche

Sea salt

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200C
  2. Wrap the chicken in foil with a little oil and lemon juice.
  3. Place chicken in oven and bake for 20 minutes until cooked through
  4. Cook the grains, drain and leave to cool
  5. Once the chicken has cooled, thinly slice
  6. Add all the dressing ingredients to the blender and blend for a minute until fully combined (add a little water until it is the consistency of single cream – it should be quite runny
  7. Add the grains, chicken, mango, red onion, watercress, mint and coriander  to a large salad bowl 8. Dress salad with dressing

 

Aniseed green juice

Serves two

Ingredients

1 bunch of spinach, washed

1 bunch of mint

1 cucumber

2 green apples, cored

1 fennel bulb 1⁄2 lemon

Method

  1. Chop ingredients and blend high for 30 seconds
  2. Lay muslin over a bowl, pour in juice then grab the four corners of cloth and squeeze out the juice

 

Green goddess juice

Serves two

Ingredients

1/2 cucumber

3 kale leaves (take soft leaf off the stem)

1 small handful coriander

1 lime (juice only)

1 head Romaine lettuce

2 apples, cored 

Method

  1. Chop ingredients and blend high for 30 seconds
    Lay muslin over a bowl, pour in juice then grab the four corners of cloth and squeeze out the juice

 

Carrot, beetroot, apple and ginger

Serves two

Ingredients

2 carrots

2 beetroot

2 apple
s, cored 

1 inch knob of ginger

1 lemon, juiced

Method

  1. Chop ingredients and blend high for 30 seconds
    Lay muslin over a bowl, pour in juice then grab the four corners of cloth and squeeze out the juice

 

Raw cacao cashew milk

Serves two

Ingredients

150g raw cashews

2-3 level tablespoons raw cacao powder (depending on taste. I like 2)

2 Tablespoons pure Maple Syrup

Vanilla pod

Pinch of sea salt

600ml 
water

Method

  1. Add ingredients to a high power blender and blitz for 1 minute
  2. Add more or less water depending on the desired consistency.

 

Shakshuka

Serves two

Ingredients

2 tsp extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp fennel seeds

1 onion, finely diced 

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

2 red peppers, cut into strips

2 tsp smoked paprika

1 pinch saffron

2 tins chopped tomatoes

Sea salt

Black pepper

4 eggs

Method

  1. Heat up the oil and add the fennel seeds cooking for 1 minute
  2. Add in the onion, garlic and cook for another 3 minutes
  3. Add in the peppers, spices, tomatoes, salt and pepper. Cook for 25 minutes until the peppers are soft (you will need to add more water as you go)
  4. make small wells in the tomato sauce and drop in the eggs then put the lid on and cook for 5 minutes until the whites of the egg are cooked

 Serve with spinach or toast

 

Cajun chicken

Serves two 

Ingredients

Marinade

1 tbsp smoked paprika

2 tbsp ground cumin

1 tbsp ground coriander

1 garlic clove, crushed

1 tsp olive oil

4 skinless chicken breast

Salad

150g spinach, chopped

A handful each of parsley, mint and coriander (finely chopped)

½ red onion, diced

1 tsp olive oil

2 avocados, cubed

Mango salsa

1 mango, diced

5 cherry tomatoes, diced

A handful coriander, chopped

1 lime, juiced

½ chilli, finely diced

Sea salt

Black pepper

Method

  1. Combine marinade spices and chicken in a large bowl then set aside for 10 minute
  2. Heat up a large non-stick frying pan (or griddle)
  3. Whilst the pan is heating up wrap each marinated chicken breast in cling film and seals at the ends then bash lightly to 1 cm thick
  4. Cook each chicken breast for about 5 minutes each side until cooked
  5. Combine salad ingredients together
  6. Combine salsa ingredients together
  7. Serve the chicken with salsa and salad

 

Download as PDF Favourite recipes

For nutrition and cookery videos click here